Mysteries of the Unseen World 3D

 

I love seeing films at the Science Museum IMAX cinema and their 3D choices are usually outstanding so I was pleased to be invited to see Mysteries of the Unseen World 3D.

Mysteries of the Unseen World3D

It’s a National Geographic film, narrated by Oscar-winning actor Forest Whitaker, featuring the work of acclaimed cinematographer Louis Schwartzberg, who is the only cinematographer in the world to have been shooting time-lapse film footage 24 hours a day, 7 days per week continuously over the past three decades.

In this film you can discover things that are too fast, or too slow or too small to see with the naked eye. Using time-lapse photography, electron microscopy and nanotechnology, you can take a closer look at a universe of creatures, processes and phenomena you never even knew existed.

You get to see the flight of a dragonfly – four wings all working indepently. Did you know a dragonfly can fly upside down? Nope, me neither.

Actually this film is full of ‘did you knows’. Did you know mosquitos see infrared vision so they can go to the warmer parts of your body to drink blood? Did you know bees see using ultra-violet (UV) light? Did you know a butterfly’s wings are covered in scales?

You’ll see the invisible rays of light all around us and the bacteria living on a human body. Yes, that means you and me. My favourite fact is that there are 1,000 bacteria in our belly button. Yeah, bet you feel itchy now.

We got to see what’s in the air, and, therefore, what we’re breathing in. We saw bugs with smaller bugs living on them. We saw close-ups that went in to the cell level.

I have to say this is my favourite 3D film I’ve seen at the Science Museum IMAX as it leaves you knowing there’s so much we never get to see and it changes our view of the world forever. Seriously, awe-inspiring stuff. Recommended.

Mysteries of the Unseen World 3D (U) is suitable for children aged 8+. To see a trailer and for booking information visit: www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/mysteries

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