A Dittea About Me

 

I met Elizabeth Darcy-Jones a few years ago when she was Tea Poet in Residence at The Chesterfield Mayfair. She is Britain’s Tea Poet and it was only a matter of time really before we would meet and become friends.

We got together recently – for tea, of course – at Camellia’s Tea House which I have to say is a real tea lover’s paradise. As well as serving a huge variety of teas they also sell blended teas to purchase and take home (I’m drinking ‘Beautiful Skin‘ while writing this) plus teapots, cups and all the other goodies that makes tea such a nice ritual. They also have cakes and snacks including gluten-free options.

Anyway, after our catch-up, Liz emailed me to say she had written a poem about me! I’ll admit I was shy about it but also thrilled as it’s such an honour. As I adore tea, to have a poem written about me as a tea blend is fantastic. I would love it if you would pop over to her site to read the ‘Dittea‘ there. Thanks.

TeaPoet

SUDA Thai

 

St Martin’s Courtyard is easy to miss but well worth finding as it’s a Covent Garden shopping and dining destination away from traffic.

suda

One of the restaurants is SUDA Thai which offers regional Thai cuisine that’s great for sharing. Dining is on the ground floor and first floor, plus plenty of space outside in the courtyard too.

I visited with my daughter to try the Lunch Meal Deal menu which is two courses for £10.95 or three courses for £13.95.

Pad Thai (stir-fried rice noodles with tofu)

Pad Thai (stir-fried rice noodles with tofu)

We dined inside on the ground floor and while I commented that it was a bit dark inside my daughter pointed out she thought the images of sacks on the walls made it look as if we were inside a ship and she liked that. She also liked the upbeat background music and the TV screen which was initially showing scenes from a Thai festival but changed to Top Gear. I thought that was odd but she was happy watching.

At lunchtime we saw lots of local workers coming in for a quick lunch for also shoppers stopping by and other families.

From the Lunch Menu we chose Porpia Tod (crispy spring rolls) and Pad Thai (stir-fried rice noodles with tofu), and Gaeng Kiew Waan Pak (mixed vegetable green curry with rice) and ice-cream for dessert. All arrived quickly which is great when you have limited time in your lunch break.

springrolls

The spring rolls got a big thumbs up from us both as they were delicious. I’d happily go back again and just order some of these to share and a couple of fruit smoothies.

SUDA Smoothie: Strawberries blended with banana, grenadine and fresh lime juice Tropical Smoothie: Fresh papaya and passion fruit blended with orange juice

SUDA Smoothie: Strawberries blended with banana, grenadine and fresh lime juice
Tropical Smoothie: Fresh papaya and passion fruit blended with orange juice

We shared our main meals and I was pleased neither was too spicy so we enjoyed both. I did think the Pad Thai was much bigger than the green curry and rice though.

Gaeng Kiew Waan Pak (mixed vegetable green curry with rice)

Gaeng Kiew Waan Pak (mixed vegetable green curry with rice)

While my daughter had her ice-cream dessert (I have no idea how she could eat any more!), I enjoyed a pot of Lemongrass Tea which came in a small black teapot with a handleless Chinese teacup. The tea was delicious but I had to wait for it to cool down as the cup was too hot to pick up for some time.

teapot

All in all, we had a lovely lunch and will definitely be returning. The cocktail menu also looks good so I think this would be a great place to bring friends on a summer evening.

SUDA Thai Cafe Restaurant
St Martin’s Courtyard
off Upper St. Martin’s Lane (and Long Acre)
Covent Garden
London WC2E 9AB

Official Website: www.suda-thai.com

Disclaimer: As is common in the travel industry, the writer was provided with complimentary services for review purposes. While it has not influenced this review, I believe in full disclosure of all potential conflicts of interest.

Tour de France in London

 

On Monday 7 July 2014, Stage 3 of Le Tour Yorkshire – Grand Depart 2014 (the Tour de France) reached London. I decided to watch at Woodford New Road (on the E17 side of Waterworks Corner roundabout) as it’s where the cyclists would first enter London (Woodford is Essex and Walthamstow is London), it’s a long straight road, and I guessed there would be lots of space to watch. I was right on all counts.

This is normally a really busy road so the kids enjoyed the space for a quick game of footie while waiting.

This is normally a really busy road so the kids enjoyed the space for a quick game of footie while waiting.

I arrived at 1pm and the caravan was due at 1.15-ish. There really weren’t many spectators there are the time so I got a good spot beside a cattle grid as I thought the riders might slow down here and it would give me a better chance to get a few photos.

Our Tourmakers hd a lot of waiting too.

Our Tourmakers had a lot of waiting time too.

The caravan arrived and our long straight road meant they zoomed down at high speed flinging freebies to the few spectators. Caps and sweets were most prized by the kids.

And here they come!

And here they come!

Bic

FruitShoot

 

Haribo

cow

chips1

Yes, you did just see a photo of an enormous bag of McCain’s Chips.

chips2

The most bonkers one I saw, I reckon.

Then it was back to waiting.

Local cyclists entertained the kids, while we were waiting, by doing wheelies.down the quiet road

Local cyclists entertained the kids, while we were waiting, by doing wheelies down the quiet road.

At around 3.15pm the cyclists reached this edge of London.

heretheycome

clump

 

That cattle grid caused a lot of riders to slow down.

That cattle grid caused a lot of riders to slow down.

cattlegrid-tdf

 

What is going on here?!

What is going on here?!

And then it was all over in minutes and the crowd dispersed. Within 2 minutes of the riders passing most of us were on our way home.

 

Latest Articles by Laura Porter

 

I write the About.com London Travel site and write for many more publications about London, UK Travel, family travel and plenty of other stuff too.
Click on About Me to… um… find out more about me and I’ll try and remember to add links to my latest work here.

July 2014: Royal Childhood at Buckingham Palace (this site) – coming soon

July 2014: Nadler Kensington Hotel Review (About.com) – coming soon

July 2014: Kingsway Hall Hotel Gluten-Free Afternoon Tea Review (About.com) – coming soon

July 2014: How To Sleep On A Hot Night (OIK Strategy)

July 2014: Afternoon Tea On a Vintage Routemaster London Bus (Londontopia)

July 2014: August in London (London Bridge Hotel blog)

July 2014: Imperial War Museum London Reopens (Londontopia)

July 2014: SUDA Thai restaurant review (this site)

July 2014: Why Is Visiting Museums So Tiring? (OIK Strategy)

July 2014: Tour de France in London (this site)

July 2014: Thriller Live review (About.com)

July 2014: Beefeater Gin Distillery Tour London (About.com)

July 2014: Analogue Guide: London – book review (About.com)

July 2014: Leiths School of Food and Wine (About.com)

July 2014: Free Day Out For Families in London (Visit London)

July 2014: 10 Things For Families To Do In The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park (Visit London)

July 2014: Churchill War Rooms Review (this site)

June 2014: Houses of Parliament New Family Audio Tours (this site)

June 2014: Bank of England Museum (this site)

June 2014: Namaaste Kitchen (this site)

June 2014: Bridge – Museum of London Docklands (this site)

June 2014: Helsinki #finnairtweets (this site)

June 2014: World’s Most Tweeting Arline (this site)

June 2014: City Vision: The City in 2050 (this site)

June 2014: Summer Afternoon Bee – afternoon tea review (this site)

June 2014: What is #FriFotos? (this site)

June 2014: Loneliness (OIK Strategy)

June 2014: What Does A Hotel Butler Do? (OIK Strategy)

June 2014: Rosewood London – hotel review (About.com)

June 2014: Where To Eat Near Trafalgar Square (About.com)

June 2014: Mount London – book review (About.com)

June 2014: How To Not Look Like A Tourist In London (About.com)

June 2014: July in London (London Bridge Hotel blog)

May 2014: WW2 Bunker in North London (this site)

May 2014:  wrote these London neighbourhood guides for housetrip.com:

May 2014: RHS Chelsea Flower Show (this site)

May 2014: Goodbye Piccadilly (this site)

May 2014: Insomnia (OIK Strategy)

May 2014: Why Is Hotel Room Lighting So Dim? (OIK Strategy)

May 2014: Brown Hart Gardens (this site)

May 2014: June in London (London Bridge Hotel blog)

April 2014: Aldwych Tube Station Tour (this site)

April 2014: Glorious Georges at Kensington Palace (this site)

April 2014: Chop’d New Menu Launch (this site)

April 2014: Food Hygiene Ratings (OIK Strategy)

April 2014: Uncyclopedia (OIK Strategy)

April 2014: May in London (London Bridge Hotel blog)

March 2014: April in London (London Bridge Hotel blog)

February 2014: March in London (London Bridge Hotel blog)

January 2014: February in London (London Bridge Hotel blog)

December 2013: January in London (London Bridge Hotel blog)

Prior to this I’ve written for the About.com London Travel site since 2006 and written for many other publications too.

Churchill War Rooms

 

Since visiting the WW2 Bunker in North London I’ve been wanting to go back to the Cabinet War Rooms in central London but I kept finding a queue outside like this:

A line outside this long is quite normal at the Churchill War Rooms. It took me three attempts to find a smaller line that I was willing to join.

A line outside this long is quite normal at the Churchill War Rooms. It took me three attempts to find a smaller line that I was willing to join.

But, eventually, I found a time with a slightly shorter queue so I could revisit and see if this is still a “must see” attraction.

Firstly, it’s not called the Cabinet War Rooms or the Churchill Museum any more; this is the Churchill War Rooms.

Upon arrival, there are bag security checks and then you move downstairs to the Ticket Desk. An adult ticket is currently (2014) £17.50 and kids go free. An audio guide is included in the price.

Literally the first room you see is the War Cabinet Room and everyone stops to listen to their audio so the way into the room is blocked from the moment you arrive. Welcoming, eh? A member of staff here would be useful to encourage people to move further into the room but I didn’t see a member of staff at all during my visit. It would have been helpful again later when my audio guide broke – I was standing still with it hanging round my neck and it just fell off and I couldn’t reattach it so had to carry it for another hour.

So, this sets the scene for the visit. You’ll be moving through in ‘clumps’ with many people just in front of you so you can’t see much.

As everyone is listening to an audio guide it's pretty quiet inside this attraction.

As everyone is listening to an audio guide it’s pretty quiet inside this attraction.

It’s a very dark attraction and although photography is allowed you may find it’s too dark to get many memory pics. And there are those ‘freaky waxworks’ that dated attractions adore so much.

What's that? We're being watched?

What’s that? We’re being watched?

I guess the real reason visitors want to see this place is because it has been preserved as it was found so it hasn’t changed. But, that doesn’t mean the visitor experience can’t be updated.

The last attempt to improve was in 2005 when the Churchill Museum opened. It’s a large room within the attraction but, oddly, it’s even darker than the rest which makes the sharp corners of cabinets quite a hazard. I picked up a map at the entrance but it was too dark inside to be able to see it!

This 'chronology table' should be great but not many visitors could work out how to use it.

This ‘chronology table’ should be great but not many visitors could work out how to use it.

It's not a touch-screen table - as visitors expect now. You have to find these strips on the side to call up information.

It’s not a touch-screen table – as visitors expect now. You have to find these strips on the side to call up information.

Apparently, the Churchill Museum divides his life into five eras. There’s no one path to follow so I’m sure I missed loads as I saw nothing in any order. Audio has been added here and I suddenly heard lots of cheers but still have no clue what that was all about. There were also multiple videos but there were four in the same area all running at the same time which was overwhelming.

A lovely quote.

A lovely quote.

I looked around for about 15 minutes and then tried to find the way out but there was no signage for an exit. And, remember, there are no members of staff anywhere to ask. So I tried the way we had entered which turned out to right and got us straight back on the ‘audio guide/moving around in clumps/not being able to see anything’ circuit.

CWR2

My visit lasted for 1.5 hours and that was enough. Being underground with such low lighting actually makes you feel very tired.

CWR3

Even when it was time to leave there was no-one I could tell about the broken audio guide and overall I felt disappointed. Being ‘the real thing’ is not enough when you’re a visitor attraction. The audio guide was so dry it only added to the tiredness and it’s really not appealing to children even though they can visit for free. I noticed there was a school visit planned (a table had a cloth covering exhibits ready for the kids) and I wondered how they would make this more interesting for them. Education about wartime is important but that doesn’t mean you can only learn through seeing room-sets or boring guides. I don’t expect the Churchill War Rooms to be a laugh a minute or full of interactives but it does need to be more visitor-friendly. I remember the cafe was actually quite nice when I visited five years ago but no-one was stopping this time as, I think, they just wanted to get outside and away from it.

Official Website: www.iwm.org.uk/visits/churchill-war-rooms

What Is #FriFotos?

 

#FriFotos is a twitter hashtag for weekly photo sharing based on a theme. It takes place every Friday and has three regular hosts: @EpsteinTravels (the founder) plus @CharlesYap and @TravelDesigned, plus a couple of guest co-hosts.

What’s the Theme?

The theme is announced on Tuesdays at 12pm ET (as that’s where @EpsteinTravels is based). The hosts will share the chosen theme during the week in case you miss the announcement.

That gives you a few days to look through your photos or maybe take a few new ones.

The theme is usually quite general so it’s open to interpretation. For example, ‘summer’ could be photos of anything that happens in your summertime: swimming in the sea, playing games, drinking cocktails, music festivals, playing on the beach, hiking in the mountains, sitting on the grass, flowers, sunny views, etc. But do stick to the theme as posting snow photos for a ‘hot’ theme makes no sense.

How Do I Get Involved?

On the Friday you just share your photos and include the #FriFotos hashtag. It’s as simple as that! The hosts retweet some of the highlights to share your photo with a new audience.

What About Copyright?

No-one is taking your photo from you and you still have full ownership. This is just a way to share photos. You can upload the photo directly to twitter or share a link from Facebook (check your permission levels allow the photo to be seen though). Or you can upload your photo to Flickr and share a link from there or from your own blog or website. The photo is still yours and the idea is simply to celebrate a theme and enjoy some great photographs.

When?

#FriFotos last all day long on each Friday so you don’t have to worry about posting at the right time. The hosts are spread across the world so someone will be there to admire your photo whenever you share it. It’s not based on one time zone and is most definitely for everybody.

Why?

For fun! Because great images make us happy. No-one makes any money from being involved with #FriFotos; it’s just enjoyable.

 

This post was written as I’m a guest host on Friday 27 July 2014 but the information may be helpful for any week.

summer

Bridge – Museum of London Docklands

 

In celebration of the 120th anniversary of Tower Bridge, the Museum of London Docklands has a free summer exhibition simply called Bridge although it’s not focusing on only that one iconic river crossing.

The curators have searched the Museum of London’s significant art collections to exhibit rarely seen contemporary and historical artworks, plus photography and film, making this the largest art exhibition ever to be staged at the Museum of London Docklands.

The oldest photograph in the museum’s collection has also never been on display before. It’s by William Henry Fox Talbot and is called ‘Old Hungerford Bridge’. It’s a salt print photograph and shows Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s original Hungerford Bridge in the year it opened – 1845. It was one of the longest suspension bridges at the time (1,462ft) but was demolished, ironically, within 15 years to make way for a railway bridge.

William Henry Fox Talbot - Old Hungerford Bridge, c1845 - IN4788

This delicate salt print will only be on display during the first month of the exhibition for conservation reasons. It’s in a darkened room and you can press a button to get a few seconds of light to admire.

Bridges are not just functional, connecting across the river’s divide, they offer a different view and feel. They have an emotional appeal and show the power of the river. Bridges offer an unconventional view of the city and the first section of the exhibition (River) features unconventional views of bridges.

Bridge looks at all of London’s bridges and how they allow us to move around the city, as well as providing inspiration for artists. The exhibition is displayed in themes: River, Building, Crowds, Icon and Bridge. Here are some examples from each category.

River

Crispin Hughes Hungerford Bridge, from the series Unquiet Thames Colour-coupler print, made in 2006 © Crispin Hughes/Museum of London

Crispin Hughes
Hungerford Bridge, from the series Unquiet Thames
Colour-coupler print, made in 2006
© Crispin Hughes/Museum of London

Lucinda Grange Inside London Bridge Pigment print made 2014 © Lucinda Grange

Lucinda Grange
Inside London Bridge
Pigment print made 2014
© Lucinda Grange

William Raban Beating the Bridges Colour Digibeta film, made in 1998 (duration: 11 mins) © William Raban

William Raban
Beating the Bridges
Colour Digibeta film, made in 1998 (duration: 11 mins)
© William Raban

I was lucky enough to meet William Raban at a preview of the exhibition and was thrilled to discover he was just as friendly and inspiring as I hoped. I could have watched this film over and over again as it starts with the early morning scenes of west London at Richmond Bridge and introduced the rhythmic sounds of the trains before we get Paul Burwell sitting on a boat wearing a business suit playing a full drum kit! The sound bounces under the bridges and it is bonkers but brilliant. The film journey ends at Dartford in the east.

Building

Gideon Yates A View Near the New London Bridge Watercolour on paper, made in 1829 © Museum of London

Gideon Yates
A View Near the New London Bridge
Watercolour on paper, made in 1829
© Museum of London

Thomas Heatherwick Visualisation of the proposed Garden Bridge between the Southbank and Temple Pigment print, made in 2014 © Arup

Thomas Heatherwick
Visualisation of the proposed Garden Bridge between the Southbank and Temple
Pigment print, made in 2014
© Arup

Do notice what an idyllic view of London this shows – there are no cranes, building sites at all!

Crowds

Barry Lewis London Bridge Gelatin silver print The new London Bridge, which opened in 1973, had heated pavements that prevented ice from forming during the winter. © Barry Lewis/Museum of London

Barry Lewis
London Bridge
Gelatin silver print
The new London Bridge, which opened in 1973, had heated pavements that prevented ice from forming during the winter.
© Barry Lewis/Museum of London

Icon

Marion Davies The City from Tower Bridge C-type print, made in 1998 © Marion Davies

Marion Davies
The City from Tower Bridge
C-type print, made in 1998
© Marion Davies

Bridge

Joseph Farrington Westminster Bridge Ink and watercolour on paper, made in 1789-90 © Joseph Farrington/Museum of London

Joseph Farrington
Westminster Bridge
Ink and watercolour on paper, made in 1789-90
© Joseph Farrington/Museum of London

There is also a new sonic art commission by Scanner called Bridging the World which will be revealed at Late London: sonic city on 5 September. It’s a collection of names of bridges across the world spoken by those who submitted them as ‘vocal contributions’.

Exhibition Visitor Information
Exhibition Title: Bridge
Address: Museum of London Docklands, No.1 Warehouse, West India Quay, London E14 4AL
Dates: Friday 27 June to Sunday 2 November 2014
Admission: Free
Website:www.museumoflondon.org.uk/docklands

A fabulous hybrid image of Charing Cross.

A fabulous hybrid image of Charing Cross. © Museum of London 

Summer Afternoon Bee

 

I’ve enjoyed the Chesterfield Mayfair afternoon tea a few times so it was good to return for the new ‘Afternoon Bee‘. This honey-themed afternoon tea is available from June to September 2014 and is inspired by the 60,000 bees in the hives on the hotel’s rooftop.

14293815880_5075794bde_b

Did you know that one in three mouthfuls of the food we eat is dependent on pollination? I took my daughter with me to try the seasonal delights as she’s been learning about bees and wild flowers recently.

minttea

While perusing the menu do admire the delightful paintings behind the words as these were done by one of the Reception staff, and there’s a poem by Elizabeth Darcy Jones, Britain’s Tea Poet. Then enjoy your iced mint tea to cleanse your palate before the cake stand arrives.

teapot

We tried two of the new teas: Organic Rosebuds, and Elderflower and Lemon Verbana – both caffeine-free so I could share with my daughter. The Rosebuds is the more delicate flavour and the Elderflower and Lemon Verbana was really refreshing. I also liked the Jing glass teapots and the fact hot water was added regularly without needing to ask.

cakestand

The cake stand was laid out traditionally – finger sandwiches on the lowest level, scones in the middle and sweet treats on the top but the cakes were wonderfully creative. The Rosemary and honey macaroon with chocolate ganache was my daughter’s favourite but I have to say the Flower pot of chocolate mousse and chocolate almond soil was mine! I have never eaten from a flower pot before – at least not at the dinner table – and this was both quirky and delicious.

bee

I struggled to convince my daughter to eat sandwiches first as she just wanted to go straight to the cakes. She did hold back long enough to eat the smoked salmon sandwich – and to ask for more – before nibbling from the top layer commenced.

scones

 

I, on the other hand, showed amazing restraint and enjoyed my vegetarian finger sandwiches and then moved on to the scones. We received individual pots of clotted cream and homemade strawberry jam/preserve each which saved the concerns about jam in the cream. The scones were incredibly good and cut easily – almost fell into two – and were perfectly soft and not crumbly at all.

14479565841_f1155377dc_b

 

The music was from a keyboard/piano in the Butler’s Restaurant and, as were advised we could make requests, my daughter asked for some Beatles songs and then sang along.

Booking Information

Afternoon Bee is from £34.50 per person. At the end of your visit guests are invited to dip their hand in the honeypot for a guaranteed prize on their next visit (from a discount on your next afternoon tea to an overnight stay in a luxury suite). Full info: www.chesterfieldmayfair.com/bar-and-dining/afternoon-tea/afternoon-bee

Disclaimer: As is common in the travel industry, the writer was provided with complimentary services for review purposes. While it has not influenced this review, I believe in full disclosure of all potential conflicts of interest.

 

Bank of England Museum

 

The Bank of England Museum is free to visit so I popped in to see the changes from the three-month refurbishment earlier this year.

The Rotunda where there are temporary exhibitions and you can lift up a gold bar.

The reconstruction of Soane’s Bank Stock Office is the most changed and there’s a new “Take the helm!” display. I’ll admit, I was confused by the interactive boat game to control inflation and I expect the noise of the controls are pretty irritating to the gift shop staff.

This replaces the ‘fly a hot air balloon’ to control inflation game but some of the other interactives remain.

This was here before the refurbishment too.

This was here before the refurbishment too.

While in the Bank’s Stock Office do look up and you’ll see something unexpected.

Look up in the Banking Hall to see the stuffed cat!

Look up in the Banking Hall to see the stuffed cat!

Lots of the other exhibits have remained the same and I’d never noticed the million pound note until a friend pointed it out so it could do with better signage.

It's a shame there's not better signage to find this, and there isn't a copy of the £100 million note used today. This was used in the Bank during the 18th century for internal accounting.

It’s a shame there’s not better signage to find this, and there isn’t a copy of the £100 million note used today. This was used in the Bank during the 18th century for internal accounting.

The waxworks of William Pitt (Prime Minister) and Charles Fox (arch opponent) have been removed at the entrance to the Rotunda and there are now temporary exhibits on display.

The Rotunda where there are temporary exhibitions and you can lift up a gold bar.

The Rotunda where there are temporary exhibitions and you can lift up a gold bar.

The Rotunda does still have the ‘lift a gold bar’ opportunity (no photos allowed of that) and the Wind in the Willows display as the author, Kenneth Grahame, worked at the Bank. During school holidays there are often storytelling sessions from costumed actors in this area, as well as other free activities.

The gift shop highlight was this gold bar replica money box.

My favourite item in the gift shop.

My favourite item in the gift shop.

Bank of England Museum Address: Bartholomew Lane, London EC2R 8AH

Official Website: www.bankofengland.co.uk/museum

 

Houses of Parliament New Family Audio Tours

 

Following the successful launch of new audio tours and enhanced guided tours earlier this year, the Houses of Parliament have added a new self-guided tour created especially for families with children. The audio tour commentary includes time traveller ‘live’ news reports for stories associated with this iconic and historic building.

BigBen

Once through security checks you collect the audio guide from Westminster Hall. My eight year old daughter was thrilled we could walk around independently and didn’t have to remain quiet to listen to a Tour Guide.

Horrible Histories has definitely influenced the family audio tour as “A rat has just ran over my foot!” was heard before we had left Westminster Hall.

As well as learning facts and information about the building and UK Parliament, there were quiz questions at the end of some stops which we liked and the atmospheric background sounds helped make it more interesting too.

For some reason, I doubt I’ll ever forget that the chandelier in the Central Lobby weighs more than a hippopotamus as that’s a bizarre comparison and great mental image.

We started out with plenty of enthusiasm but I could see the 8yo was flagging after about an hour. But the audio guides means you no longer miss what the Tour Guide said at the front of the group, nor are you rushed to keep to a schedule.

It’s still an austere and imposing building and the lack of opportunities to sit, plus the unsmiling Visitor Services staff and Security Staff, stop it from becoming totally welcoming but this new family audio tour will certainly make it easier for families to visit.

The tour takes around 1.5 hours and I learnt something new even though I’ve visited many times.

audiotour

Booking Information

Audio tour tickets: Adults £17.50, Concessions £15, Children free with each paying adult and £7 for each additional child.

Guided tour tickets: Adults £25, Concessions £20, Children £10.

Tickets are available for Saturdays until 25 October 2014 and most weekdays between 31 July and 10 October 2014.

Booking and further info: www.parliament.uk/visiting

 

Disclaimer: As is common in the travel industry, the writer was provided with complimentary services for review purposes. While it has not influenced this review, I believe in full disclosure of all potential conflicts of interest.